Worlds of Exile and Illusion

Ursula K. Le Guin

These three novels, Le Guin’s earliest, explore the experiences of visitors on three different planets.

Bots

A letter

Aurora

Kim Stanley Robinson

Aurora follows a generational space ship as it travels to a far away solar system in search of a planet that can be safely terraformed.

Field Notes from a Catastrophe

Elizabeth Kolbert

Kolbert’s essays span Kyoto, Bush-era climate denialism, ocean acidification, Canadian tar sands, and melting glaciers.

This academic pamphlet from Donna Haraway describes dog writing as “a branch of feminist theory, or the other way around.”

Thinking Small

Daniel Immerwahr

A historical—and critical—look at the history of community development, locating its roots in dubious US-led efforts in India, the Philippines, and Vietnam.

The Lathe of Heaven

Ursula K. Le Guin

This brief novel from Ursula K. Le Guin concerns a man named George Orr who has a most unwelcome ability: his dreams have the power to alter reality.

Ancillary Mercy

Ann Leckie

The conclusion of Ann Leckie’s Imperial Radch series is more madcap than the preceding books, and fiercely satisfying.

Ancillary Sword

Ann Leckie

The second of Ann Leckie’s Imperial Radch series follows Breq as she’s given command of a ship—her first since she was herself a ship, before the Lord of the Radch destroyed it.

Ancillary Justice

Ann Leckie

The first in Ann Leckie’s Imperial Radch series introduces Breq, an AI who once inhabited a starship and many of it’s formerly-human crew.

Alias Grace

Margaret Atwood

In 1840s Toronto, a woman named Grace Marks, just shy of 16 years old, escapes with a man after one or both of them murder their employer and his housekeeper-turned-mistress.

The whole of work

The competitive advantage of the de-industrialized workplace.

Jeong calls bullshit on the predominant stance that online harassment is an unsolveable problem.

Can’t and Won’t

Lydia Davis

Critical and flippant, funny and devastating, calming and maddening.