Books by Ursula K. Le Guin

The Left Hand of Darkness

Ursula K. Le Guin

A human envoy arrives on a planet known as “Winter.” His solitary mission is to welcome the people of Winter to a collection of planets, but to do so he must first find welcome himself.

The Dispossessed

Ursula K. Le Guin

A planet named Urras is host to a habitable moon known as Anarres. Some seven generations ago, a group of communist settlers left Urras to build a colony on the moon, after which the communication between the colonists and the planet all but ceased.

The Lathe of Heaven

Ursula K. Le Guin

This brief novel from Ursula K. Le Guin concerns a man named George Orr who has a most unwelcome ability: his dreams have the power to alter reality.

Worlds of Exile and Illusion

Ursula K. Le Guin

These three novels, Le Guin’s earliest, explore the experiences of visitors on three different planets.

A Wizard of Earthsea

Ursula K. Le Guin

The first book in Le Guin’s famed Earthsea cycle introduces Ged, a young and brilliant, albeit cocky, wizard who attempts to use magic he doesn’t fully understand, with dire consequences.

The Tombs of Atuan

Ursula K. Le Guin

The second book in Le Guin’s extraordinary Earthsea cycle continues her subversion of the usual wizardly tropes: Ged, the antihero from the first book, reappears, but he serves as an accessory to another’s story—that of a young girl named Tenar.

The Farthest Shore

Ursula K. Le Guin

The third book in the Earthsea cycle makes plain what before had only been hinted at: the magic of the wizards carries a cost.

Tehanu

Ursula K. Le Guin

Two decades passed between the publication of the third book of the Earthsea cycle and this, the fourth.

Tales from Earthsea

Ursula K. Le Guin

The fifth book in the Earthsea cycle breaks from the path for five short stories, each of which reveals more about the Archipelago and the customs, traditions, and people within it.

The Other Wind

Ursula K. Le Guin

This, the final book in the Earthsea cycle, returns to the Dry Land—the land of the dead—where the barrier between life and death is crumbling.

Words Are My Matter

Ursula K. Le Guin

In this late volume, Le Guin reflects on many of the things that animated her thinking throughout her life.